And the Rains Came

a poem by
CHRISTINE TABAKA | Chemist + Poet 


 

Photo by Greg Rakozy

THE storm had passed, after raging for hours.
A deluge of major proportions. Last evening
the main road was a swift, moving river. Now
it was up to the ankles in slimy brown mud.

Everyone scratched their heads. What was
to be done now?  Even the dog from across
the way stood frozen with concern, like some
comical statue. He seemed determined that
muddy paws were not to be part of his day.
Mud baths being for swine, and not canine.

Shattered tree corpses caught up in the
flooding, their branches emerging from the
mud like a scorched forest. Reminiscent of
a bizarre, miniature landscape from an old
science fiction film, barren and colorless. 

Old folks tell of similar storms. They
happened decades ago, or so it is said,
memories being such as they are. Stories
cannot be relied upon from their retelling.

Looking up, the sky hangs heavy and
dark. More rain will come, adding to the
already distressing situation. Even the
birds are silent. No echoing songs from
the woodlands. The dead quiet, an omen.

We all walked away, knowing more mud
is coming, and for the moment, nothing
more could be done. And then once again,
the rains came as if there was no end.
And, perhaps, there wasn’t.

 


CHRISTINE TABAKA

CHRISTINE TABAKA

Chemist + Poet

Ann Christine Tabaka was born and lives in Delaware.  She is a published poet, an artist, a chemist, and a personal trainer.  She loves gardening, cooking, and the ocean.  Chris lives with her husband and two cats.  Her poems have been published in numerous national and international poetry journals, reviews, and anthologies. Chris has been selected as the resident Haiku poet for Stanzaic Stylings.