The Beauty is Inherent in the Weakness

ceramic art by
CHRIS VIVAS | Professor + Artist


My work has been described as precarious, which I welcome. Being influenced by existential writers such as Nietzsche, Sartre, and Camus, I have been intrigued with the duality of strength and fragility found within human existence. Exploring how strength synthesizes to weakness and vice versa has led me to working in ceramic.

Untitled

Porcelain and Resin, Slap Formed

Ceramics, being strong enough to used for space shuttles and yet delicate enough to shatter when dropped, functions as a perfect metaphor for the human condition. The human race is capable of such powerful achievements as the atomic bomb, but is, at the same time, so vulnerable.

Untitled

Porcelain and Resin, Slap Formed

The beauty is inherent in the weakness. Fragile structures, combined with vulnerable, jagged surfaces, lead the viewer to a split between gravitating toward, and wishing to remain distanced. It is this duality, this push and pull, that captivates viewers as they tackle the ideas of beauty and power, alongside the rough, jagged surfaces, giving a sense of rancor and irksomeness.

Pareidolia

Front and Back Views, Respectively; Porcelain and Resin

 


CHRIS VIVAS

CHRIS VIVAS

Professor + Artist

I am an artist and professor, who spends much of his time dedicated to The Arts.  I find myself always reading, checking out film, and thinking about where I would like to go next for an artist residency.  I was born in NYC, and still remain in the state, but have spent time in Japan, which has had a tremendous influence on my artwork.  I have found that inspiration comes from many outlets, whether it be from experiencing cultures while abroad or engaging in stimulating dialogue with students, I keep myself always open to experiences and ideas.
 
I have worked at home on several projects, plus, over the years, I have attended several artist residencies, where I was able to devote my entire time to the creative process.  Residencies include The Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park in Japan, The Babayan Culture House in Turkey, AIR: Artist In Residence in Vallauris, France, and the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City.