EDITOR’S APOLOGIA

The Relevance of Revival

Spring 2017 


 

 
 

THE PREFIX, re, is among the smallest, but most significant units of our language. Latin for “again”, re allows us to identify the torment of regret, the solace of redemption, and the richness of remembering. Taken on its own, “again” connotes monotony. Yet, in partnership, re evokes transformation. In the word, revival, the dull persistence of “again” converges with the dynamism of vivere—the act of living. The result is both orthodox and revolutionary. Revival simultaneously embraces conservation and progress, propelling the old into the company of the new.

In our modern appetite for advancement, we often dismiss the necessity of revival. It is easier to discard than to restore. But novelty cannot be attained de novo. Though innovation requires originality, it relies upon foundations that are deep and strong. Even the most audacious expedition departs from a familiar harbor, and carries with it the trusted tools of the old country.

This spring, The Remembered Arts Journal explores the relevance of revival to life and art. Each piece in our spring issue and weekly series examines the imperative of renewing ourselves and our society, physically, emotionally, intellectually, spiritually, and culturally. We are grateful to our artists for committing their skill and passion to this exciting project. Enjoy.

-Elise Matich

 
Photograph by Todd Quackenbush